THE INTERNATIONAL BILL OF HUMAN RIGHTS
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The United Nations Trusteeship Council

Secretary - General Mr. Ban Ki-moon | President of the General Assembly Mr. Vuk Jeremic | Member States 1945 : 51 | 2011 : 193 Member States

   

 

Functions and Powers of The Security Council

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The United Nations Trusteeship Council

The United Nations Trusteeship Council (FrenchLe Conseil de tutelle des Nations unies), one of the principal organs of the United Nations, was established to help ensure that trust territories were administered in the best interests of their inhabitants and of international peace and security. The trust territories—most of them former mandates of the League of Nations or territories taken from nations defeated at the end ofWorld War II—have all now attained self-government or independence, either as separate nations or by joining neighbouring independent countries. The last was Palau, formerly part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, which became a member state of the United Nations in December 1994.

The Trusteeship Council was formed in 1945 to oversee the decolonization of those dependent territories that were to be placed under the international trusteeship system created by the United Nations Charter as a successor to the League of Nations mandate system. Ultimately, eleven territories were placed under trusteeship: seven in Africa and four in Oceania. Ten of the trust territories had previously been League of Nations mandates; the eleventh was Italian Somaliland.

In March 1948, the United States proposed that the territory of Mandatory Palestine be placed under UN Trusteeship with the termination of the British Mandate in May 1948 (see American trusteeship proposal for Palestine). However, the US did not make an effort to implement this proposal, which became moot with the declaration of the State of Israel.

Under the Charter, the Trusteeship Council was to consist of an equal number of United Nations Member States administering trust territories and non-administering states. Thus, the Council was to consist of all U.N. members administering trust territories, the five permanent members of the Security Council, and as many other non-administering members as needed to equalize the number of administering and non-administering members, elected by the United Nations General Assembly for renewable three-year terms. Over time, as trust territories attained independence, the size and workload of the Trusteeship Council was reduced and ultimately came to include only the five permanent Security Council members (China, France, the Soviet Union/Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, and the United States).

With the independence of Palau, formerly part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, in 1994, there presently are no trust territories, leaving the Trusteeship Council without responsibilities. (Since the Northern Mariana Islands was a part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and became acommonwealth of the USA in 1986, it is technically the only area to have not joined as a part of another state or gained full independence as a sovereign nation.)

The Trusteeship Council was not assigned responsibility for colonial territories outside the trusteeship system, although the Charter did establish the principle that member states were to administer such territories in conformity with the best interests of their inhabitants.

Chamber of The United Nations Trusteeship Council | UN Headquarter NY
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The Trusteeship Council suspended operation on 1 November 1994, with the independence of Palau, the last remaining United Nations trust territory, on 1 October 1994. By a resolution adopted on 25 May 1994, the Council amended its rules of procedure to drop the obligation to meet annually and agreed to meet as occasion required -- by its decision or the decision of its President, or at the request of a majority of its members or the General Assembly or the Security Council.

In setting up an International Trusteeship System, the Charter established the Trusteeship Council as one of the main organs of the United Nations and assigned to it the task of supervising the administration of Trust Territories placed under the Trusteeship System. Major goals of the System were to promote the advancement of the inhabitants of Trust Territories and their progressive development towards self-government or independence. TheTrusteeship Council is made up of the five permanent members of the Security Council --China, France, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and United States. The aims of the Trusteeship System have been fulfilled to such an extent that all Trust Territories have attained self-government or independence, either as separate States or by joining neighbouring independent countries.

Functions and powers

Under the Charter, the Trusteeship Council is authorized to examine and discuss reports from the Administering Authority on the political, economic, social and educational advancement of the peoples of Trust Territories and, in consultation with the Administering Authority, to examine petitions from and undertake periodic and other special missions to Trust Territories.

Map of The World in 2000 | No Trusteeship Territories left
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Current Executive Director of UNICEF is Mr. Anthony LAKE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR of UNICEF Mr. Anthony LAKE
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Mr. Anthony Lake became UNICEF’s sixth Executive Director on 1 May 2010

The STRUCTURE of UNICEF

With its strong presence in 190 countries, UNICEF is the world's leading advocate for children.

The heart of UNICEF's work is in the field. Each country officecarries out UNICEF's mission through a unique programme of cooperation developed with the host government. This five-year programme focuses on practical ways to realize the rights of children and women. Their needs are analyzed in a situation report produced at the beginning of the programme cycle.Regional offices guide this work and provide technical assistance to country offices as needed. UNICEF's work is fully part of other United Nations activities in a country. 

Overall management and administration of the organization takes place at headquarters, where global policy on children is shaped. Specialized offices include the Supply Division, based in Copenhagen, which provides such essential items as the majority of  life-saving vaccine doses for children in developing countries.

UNICEF also operates the Innocenti Research Centre in Florence and Offices for Japan and Brussels, which assist with fund-raising and liaison with policy makers.

Many people in industrialized countries first hear about UNICEF’s work through the activities of 36National Committees for UNICEF. These non-governmental organizations promote children’s rights, raise funds, sell UNICEF greeting cards and products, create key corporate and civil societypartnerships, and provide other invaluable support. The committees raise a third of UNICEF's resources.

Well known National Commitee campaigns include Check Out for Children, where guests add a donation to UNICEF to their room bill when checking out; Change For Good®, which enables passengers on international airlines to donate their leftover foreign coins and notes; and 'Trick or Treat for UNICEF,' in which milions of children in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Ireland raise funds for UNICEF.

UNICEF is supported entirely by voluntary funds. Governments contribute two thirds of our resources; private groups and some 6 million individual donors contribute the rest through our National Committees. 

Guiding and monitoring all of UNICEF's work is a 36-member Executive Board made up of government representatives. They establish policies, approve programmes and decide on administrative and financial plans and budgets. Members are elected by the United Nations Economic and Social Council, usually for three-year terms.

UNICEF Headquarters

Country Web Site: http://www.unicefusa.org

NEW YORK

National Committee

Mail address

 

United States Fund for UNICEF 
125 Maiden Lane, 11th Floor
New York, NY 10038

Visitors' address

 

United States Fund for UNICEF 
125 Maiden Lane, 11th Floor
New York, NY 10038

Telephone

 

Country code

1

City code

212

 

686.5522

Facsimile

 

779.1679

Email

 

got to:http://www.unicefusa.org/about/contact/

 

NEW YORK

Headquarters

Mail address

 

UNICEF House
3 United Nations Plaza
New York, New York 10017
U.S.A.

Visitors' address

 

3 United Nations Plaza
44th Street between 1st and 2nd Avenues
New York, New York

Telephone

 

Country code

1

City code

212

 

326.7000 - Switchboard UNICEF House

Facsimile

 

887.7465 - Primary
887.7454 - Secondary

Email

 

URL http://www.unicef.org

 
UNICEF Child - Friendly School Model

The child-friendly school (CFS) model is simple: it calls for schools to operate in the best interests of the child. Child-friendly educational environments must be safe, healthy and protective. They must be provided with trained teachers, adequate resources and appropriate physical, emotional and social conditions for learning.

Within a child-friendly school, children’s rights are protected and their voices are heard. The learning environment is a haven in which children can learn and grow and in which their identities and varied needs are respected. The CFS model promotes inclusiveness, gender sensitivity, tolerance, dignity and personal empowerment.

There is no single way to make a school child-friendly. Though the model may differ from country to country, in every culture a child-friendly school provides child-centred education in a safe, healthy and holistic environment.

Child-friendly environments build on the assets that children bring from their homes and communities, respecting their unique backgrounds and circumstances. The CFS model compensates for any shortcomings in the home or community that might impede a child’s ability to enrol in school, attend regularly or succeed in studies. For example, when learning is hampered by a lack of food, a school feeding programme can provide children the nutrition they need. In such circumstances it also serves as an incentive to stay in school, reinforcing its child-friendliness.

The CFS model also builds partnerships between schools and communities. Children have the right to be fully prepared to become active and productive citizens, so their learning must be linked to the conditions and needs of their community.  

National governments can encourage the development of child-friendly schools by promoting free enrolment, prohibiting corporal punishment, encouraging the use of local languages in schools, integrating children with disabilities into mainstream schools, allowing pregnant students to complete their education, and implementing the right to education for children living with HIV and/or AIDS. 

To ensure sustainability of the CFS approach, governments can work to infuse key elements of the CFS model into all aspects of the education system, including the processes and parameters that shape the system. This means that planning, implementation, financing, staffing, management, supervision, monitoring and evaluation of education in the country will intrinsically embrace the CFS model.

In the past decade, the CFS approach has become UNICEF’s preferred strategy for promoting quality education, even during emergencies. When emergencies strike, UNICEF provides school-in-a-box kits to temporary child-friendly learning spaces. The routine of going to school helps children recover from trauma while also keeping their education on track. Our success in implementing the CFS model depends on collaboration with international partners. Together, we work to ensure that all children – regardless of whether they attend school in a building, in a tent or under a tree – receive a rights-based, quality education.

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre Florence Italy

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre in FlorenceItaly, was established in 1988, to strengthen the research capability of the United Nations Children's Fund and to support its advocacy for children worldwide.

The centre, formally known as the International Child Development Centre, has as its prime objectives to improve international understanding of issues relating to children's rights, to promote economic policies that advance the cause of children, and to help facilitate the full implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in industrialized and developing countries.

The programme for 2006–2008 was approved by UNICEF Executive Board in September 2005. It reaffirms the centre's academic freedom and the focus of IRC's research on knowledge gaps, emerging questions and sensitive issues which are relevant to the realization of children's rights, in developing and industrialized countries. It capitalizes on IRC's role as an interface between UNICEF field experience, international experts, research networks and policy makers and is designed to strengthen the centre's institutional collaboration with regional academic and policy institutions, pursuing the following goals:

Three interrelated strategies will guide the achievement of these goals:

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre Florence | Italy | Established in 1988
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Current President of The ECOSOC is His Excellency Néstor OSORIO .

His Excellency Néstor Osorio was elected sixty-ninth President of the Economic and Social Council on 28 January 2013. Ambassador Osorio is currently the Ambassador

and

Permanent Representative of Colombia to the United Nations in New York.

ECOSOC BUREAU

The Bureau of the Economic and Social Council is elected by the Council at large at the beginning of each annual session. The Bureau's main functions are to propose the agenda, draw up

a programme of work and organize the session with the support of the United Nations Secretariat.

Bureau members for 2013:

President of ECOSOC: H.E. Ambassador Néstor Osorio (Colombia)

Vice-President of ECOSOC: H. E. Ambassador Daffa-Alla Elhag Ali Osman (Sudan)

Vice-President of ECOSOC: H.E. Ambassador Masood Khan (Pakistan)

Vice-President of ECOSOC: H. E. Ambassador Ferit Hoxha (Albania)

Vice-President of ECOSOC: H.E. Ambassador Martin Sajdik (Austria)

United Nations Economic and Social Council | ECOSOC
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ECOSOC MEMBERS

The Council's 54 member Governments are elected by the General Assembly for overlapping three-year terms. Seats on the Council are allotted based on geographical representation with fourteen allocated to African States, eleven to Asian States, six to Eastern European States, ten to Latin American and Caribbean States, and thirteen to Western European and other States.

ECOSOC Members | On Right Year Term Expires per 31 December

Albania

2015

Austria

2014

Belarus

2014

Benin

2015

Bolivia (Plurinational State of)

2015

Brazil

2014

Bulgaria

2013

Burkina Faso

2014

Cameroon

2013

Canada

2015

China

2013

Colombia

2015

Croatia

2015

Cuba

2014

Denmark

2013

Dominican Republic

2014

Ecuador

2013

El Salvador

2014

Ethiopia

2014

France

2014

Gabon

2013

Haiti

2015

India

2014

Indonesia

2014

Ireland

2014

Japan

2014

Kuwait

2015

Kyrgyzstan

2015

Latvia

2013

Lesotho

2014

Libya

2014

Malawi

2013

Mauritius

2015

Mexico

2013

Nepal

2015

Netherlands

2015

New Zealand

2013

Nicaragua

2013

Nigeria

2014

Pakistan

2013

Qatar

2013

Republic of Korea

2013

Russian Federation

2013

San Marino

2015

Senegal

2013

South Africa

2015

Spain

2014

Sudan

2015

Sweden

2013

Tunisia

2015

Turkey

2014

Turkmenistan

2015

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

2013

United States of America

2015

 


 

Brief List of SUBSIDIARY BODIES OF ECOSOC

ECOSOC Functional Commissions

ECOSOC Regional Commissions


ECOSOC Standing Committees

QUEEN RANIA AL ABDULLAH of JORDAN
 
 
 

 

Credit : www.un.org